Some stills from my first film, Bonds. 

This is what I’ve been working on for the past 2 months! Man, so many ups and down with this.. I finished it for class, but I’m going to continue working on it for the next month or so before I publish it online. Most likely going to rework the backgrounds and tweak the character designs some, among other things. 

This year in animation has been quite something. It was hard, but I’m so glad I got into this program, even if it was sort of on a whim. I Really learned a lot, and met so many amazing people! Talented, great people. It really motivated me to keep working hard. Anyways, more on this soonish! 

Lonely Rolling Star


45,623 plays

8-bit-demixes:

Katamari Damacy - Lonely Rolling Star

(original MIDI by Blue.Nocturne - art by pronouncedyou)

Pure Space
Unicorn Kid
Pure Space
10,293 plays

iambillyshears:

PURE SPACE|UNICORN KID

HELLA JUICED.

Parade
Paprika
Paprika OST
86,811 plays

You can not write the word “ignorance”. The future is on sale.

Push aside and laugh at the karmic tale saying it’s superstition.
ianjq:

SU is coming back at a new night and time— Don’t miss out!

Absolutely can’t wait for the new episode!! Perfect way to celebrate finishing my first animated film.. Although I’ll probably watch it friday because i’m so swamped aaaa

ianjq:

SU is coming back at a new night and time— Don’t miss out!

Absolutely can’t wait for the new episode!! Perfect way to celebrate finishing my first animated film.. Although I’ll probably watch it friday because i’m so swamped aaaa

Let Me Be With You
ROUND TABLE featuring Nino
Let Me Be With You
28,541 plays

glowcloud:

freewindcastle:

ROUND TABLE featuring Nino - Let Me Be With You
Single: Let Me Be With You
Genre: Pop, Pop Rock

if u dont jam 2 this song u not a real anime fan sorry i dont make the rules

byronegg:

Picture Imperfect
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Something for Teaching Tolerance magazine to accompany a story about how most children’s books and libraries lack a diverse perspective. AD Valerie Downes.

byronegg:

Picture Imperfect

—-

Something for Teaching Tolerance magazine to accompany a story about how most children’s books and libraries lack a diverse perspective. AD Valerie Downes.

Slow Life by 

"Slow" marine animals show their secret life under high magnification. Corals and sponges are very mobile creatures, but their motion is only detectable at different time scales compared to ours and requires time lapses to be seen. These animals build coral reefs and play crucial roles in the biosphere, yet we know almost nothing about their daily lives.

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaAAAAAAAAAAAAA OMYgod im so excited i cant breathe

All I can say is that I am going to have some beautiful fantastic music for my first year film…!!!! I’m so happy holy crap I just had to let this out here sfdhuihfdsifhdsdssdfdshsfd

rubbishtiger:

juliedillon:

eskiworks:

The Workaholic Pedestal
We freelancers have a tendency to never truly be away from our work, regardless of the time or day of the week.  Especially if like me, your work station is in your home.  We work long hours and dedicate ourselves fully to whatever project we have at hand.  We loose sleep, skip social gatherings, eat whatever is quick and easy so we can get back to work. I have noticed that there is a sense of pride in general among freelancers that we are so in love with our work that we can dedicate ourselves this way.  Passion for your chosen profession is definitely a plus!
However, I have also observed a downside to this part of freelancing.  That dedication can cross the line into an unhealthy workaholic lifestyle, and other freelancers actually encourage it.  There is an underlying unspoken rule in freelancer culture that if you’re not working, you’re slacking.  I’ve seen other freelancers take subtle stabs at their peers for taking time off to see family, to tend to daily life, or to just have a day (or three) to simply BREATHE and do something other than art. Doing things like comparing your work load with others’ work load, making yourself out to be the harder working one.  Referring to things like showering, cooking, and cleaning as “free time” or “vacation”.  It creates or adds to guilt surrounding work, which is really not a nice thing to do to your friends and peers. 
The disclaimer here is that clearly not every freelancer does this, and I think those that do are not being purposefully malicious, so please don’t misread this as an attack.  I’m guilty of playing into this myself, we are just falling into a part of the starving artist stereotype;  The idea that your chosen craft/art must encompass ALL of your being, every day and every moment for you to truly be passionate about it. 
The truth is, there IS life outside of art and work, and it’s not a contest. We are living beings that must eat and sleep, and we are social animals that must have a connection with others.  So not only do we HAVE to do things other than art, but it’s also ok to spend time doing other things that make you happy.  It doesn’t mean you are less passionate about your work, or that other artists who spend more time on theirs love it more.
And yes, there are deadlines we must work under.  But none of us want to be starving artists. None of us enjoy loosing sleep, eating crappy or skipping meals, working our fingers to the bone, letting friendships fall apart…  These are not good things.  You aren’t a cooler or more a passionate artist for making those sacrifices.  So I think instead of putting that lifestyle on a pedestal, we should be encouraging one another to take time to care for ourselves, and to have a life outside of their work. Just like anyone else doing any other kind of work.  =)

YES. Thank you. It makes me really uncomfortable when I hear professionals saying things like “if you are not drawing 24/7 you’ll never make it”, implying that having outside interests or taking care of yourself means you will fail. You undoubtedly need to be dedicated and focused to succeed as a freelancer, but what is the point of having the so-called freedom that freelancing is supposed to provide you if you can’t even leave your desk every once in a while? Exercise, get outside, socialize, have other hobbies. I’ve found I’m more productive and happier and healthier and more passionate about my work and my career when I take time off, every day, to get away from work for a little while. Building a career is important and rewarding, but your life is not comprised solely of the amount of work you are able do. Your life is not defined solely by how many hours you clock at your work desk. 

"You can sleep when you’re dead" was a wry commisseration when I was in college; when I hear it now I want to punch someone in the neck.

It’s literally this “work hard 24/7- if you don’t you’re a slacker” crap that gets me scared of large workloads and big projects, to the point where I do anything but work because I’m stressed out about it. And afterwards I hate myself for not working. And when I do work, I still belittle myself along the lines of “Oh you could have done this way before you lazy a**”.
Moderation is key. Relax and enjoy what you’re doing, follow a doable schedule, and don’t overwork yourself and above all don’t freak out if things don’t go 100% to plan. It’s normal for things to have to be changed around, and you have to go for it and with it. Don’t start hating yourself for “not working enough”, because it literally floors you if you repeat that to yourself enough times.. 

rubbishtiger:

juliedillon:

eskiworks:

The Workaholic Pedestal

We freelancers have a tendency to never truly be away from our work, regardless of the time or day of the week.  Especially if like me, your work station is in your home.  We work long hours and dedicate ourselves fully to whatever project we have at hand.  We loose sleep, skip social gatherings, eat whatever is quick and easy so we can get back to work. I have noticed that there is a sense of pride in general among freelancers that we are so in love with our work that we can dedicate ourselves this way.  Passion for your chosen profession is definitely a plus!

However, I have also observed a downside to this part of freelancing.  That dedication can cross the line into an unhealthy workaholic lifestyle, and other freelancers actually encourage it.  There is an underlying unspoken rule in freelancer culture that if you’re not working, you’re slacking.  I’ve seen other freelancers take subtle stabs at their peers for taking time off to see family, to tend to daily life, or to just have a day (or three) to simply BREATHE and do something other than art. Doing things like comparing your work load with others’ work load, making yourself out to be the harder working one.  Referring to things like showering, cooking, and cleaning as “free time” or “vacation”.  It creates or adds to guilt surrounding work, which is really not a nice thing to do to your friends and peers. 

The disclaimer here is that clearly not every freelancer does this, and I think those that do are not being purposefully malicious, so please don’t misread this as an attack.  I’m guilty of playing into this myself, we are just falling into a part of the starving artist stereotype;  The idea that your chosen craft/art must encompass ALL of your being, every day and every moment for you to truly be passionate about it. 

The truth is, there IS life outside of art and work, and it’s not a contest. We are living beings that must eat and sleep, and we are social animals that must have a connection with others.  So not only do we HAVE to do things other than art, but it’s also ok to spend time doing other things that make you happy.  It doesn’t mean you are less passionate about your work, or that other artists who spend more time on theirs love it more.

And yes, there are deadlines we must work under.  But none of us want to be starving artists. None of us enjoy loosing sleep, eating crappy or skipping meals, working our fingers to the bone, letting friendships fall apart…  These are not good things.  You aren’t a cooler or more a passionate artist for making those sacrifices.  So I think instead of putting that lifestyle on a pedestal, we should be encouraging one another to take time to care for ourselves, and to have a life outside of their work. Just like anyone else doing any other kind of work.  =)

YES. Thank you. It makes me really uncomfortable when I hear professionals saying things like “if you are not drawing 24/7 you’ll never make it”, implying that having outside interests or taking care of yourself means you will fail. You undoubtedly need to be dedicated and focused to succeed as a freelancer, but what is the point of having the so-called freedom that freelancing is supposed to provide you if you can’t even leave your desk every once in a while? Exercise, get outside, socialize, have other hobbies. I’ve found I’m more productive and happier and healthier and more passionate about my work and my career when I take time off, every day, to get away from work for a little while. Building a career is important and rewarding, but your life is not comprised solely of the amount of work you are able do. Your life is not defined solely by how many hours you clock at your work desk. 

"You can sleep when you’re dead" was a wry commisseration when I was in college; when I hear it now I want to punch someone in the neck.

It’s literally this “work hard 24/7- if you don’t you’re a slacker” crap that gets me scared of large workloads and big projects, to the point where I do anything but work because I’m stressed out about it. And afterwards I hate myself for not working. And when I do work, I still belittle myself along the lines of “Oh you could have done this way before you lazy a**”.

Moderation is key. Relax and enjoy what you’re doing, follow a doable schedule, and don’t overwork yourself and above all don’t freak out if things don’t go 100% to plan. It’s normal for things to have to be changed around, and you have to go for it and with it. Don’t start hating yourself for “not working enough”, because it literally floors you if you repeat that to yourself enough times..